[Cevleis-L] Child Labour News Service Release - March 15 2002

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Subject: [Cevleis-L] Child Labour News Service Release - March 15 2002
From: "Child Labour News Service" <yatra@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 16:12:13 +0550
CHILD LABOUR NEWS SERVICE
15 March 2002
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** NATIONS 'GEAR UP' FOR THE DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT
** FORMER CHILD SOLDIERS SAID TO BE BACK ON FRONT LINES 
** CENTRAL AMERICA BASTION OF CHILD SEXUAL EXPLOITATION
** TOBACCO INDUSTRY ACCUSED OF ENGAGING CHILDREN
** NEWS-IN-BRIEF
** NEW RESOURCES
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NATIONS 'GEAR UP' FOR THE DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT
Ahead of the UN summit on global poverty scheduled to being March 
18 in Monterrey, Mexico, the world's poorest countries received 
a double boost with President Bush unveiling a $5 billion package 
of aid and the European Union promising a massive increase in 
development assistance over the next five years. 
In a move that marked a historic shift in Washington's stance 
on aid after years of cuts, Mr Bush promised extra help for countries 
that agree to respect human rights and reform their economies. 
It is also seen as signalling a softening of America's unilateralist 
approach under Mr Bush. 
"To make progress, we must encourage nations and leaders to walk 
the hard road of political, legal and economic reform so all 
their people can benefit," he remarked.
In Barcelona, Europe's finance ministers overcame German opposition 
and clinched a deal that will see EU aid spending rise by $5 
billion a year by 2006. 
Berlin, faced by severe budget pressure, had been resisting the 
demands from Britain and the Scandinavian countries to increase 
the proportion of EU GDP spent on aid from 0.33% to 0.39% by 
2006. The deal will increase EU aid spending to $30 billion a 
year over the next four years. 
"This achievement shows Europe is not complacent about being 
the world's leading aid donor," said Romano Prodi, president 
of the European commission. 
But campaigners warned that even with the extra spending, aid 
budgets were still too low to meet the internationally agreed 
targets for reducing global poverty by 2015. 
According to the World Bank, financing the UN millennium development 
goals could cost up to 60 billion dollars a year in additional 
aid for the next 15 years. This is more than double the current 
levels of aid. 
"The EU/US pledges are a lot of money but it's not enough. In 
fact, it's one tenth of what's needed for rich countries to keep 
their promise to poor countries," said Justin Forsyth, Oxfam's 
policy director. "This isn't just statistics. It's about children 
dying, kids missing out on education and grinding poverty." 
Washington's aid record is likely to come under intense scrutiny 
at the Monterrey conference. Although, the proposal would effectively 
boost US assistance to developing nations by about 14% over current 
levels of more than $11 billion a year, the increase, which requires 
congressional approval, would still leave the United States well 
behind other nations in terms of the percentage of the economy 
devoted to aid. 
The disparity between American and European contributions was 
highlighted by an agreement among European Union nations to donate 
an average 0.39% of their GDP to aid by 2006, compared with America's 
current 0.1% of GDP. 
# # # 
(From the files of The Guardian) 
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FORMER CHILD SOLDIERS SAID TO BE BACK ON FRONT LINES 
Former child soldiers are once again being conscripted to participate 
in Liberia's civil war as fighting between government forces 
and the rebel Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy 
(LURD) moves closer to the capital of Monrovia.
In Liberia's past conflicts, boys as young as 6 years old were 
forced to fight for Charles Taylor's National Patriotic Front 
of Liberia (NPFL), and other rebel groups. In exchange for their 
years of fighting in the jungle, the former warlord promised 
them rich rewards when they helped him reach the capital. Out 
of estimated 15,000 child soldiers who fought during Liberia's 
civil war, only 4,300 have been demobilised. 
But five years after Mr Taylor was elected president, scores 
of young ex-combatants are on the streets of Monrovia, trying 
to eke a living from cleaning windscreens, begging or stealing. 
Some of them tried to return to their villages when the war was 
over, but they found their houses razed and their families dead 
or missing. 
Liberian Defense Minister Daniel Chea however, denied the government 
was forcibly conscripting children, arguing that young people 
are patriotically volunteering for such duty. He also criticised 
the United Nations for failing to fulfil its promise to reintegrate 
former combatants in Liberia and Sierra Leone, adding that many 
of the rebels the government is now fighting are former child 
soldiers recruited by the rebel LURD.
"At the end of our civil war in 1996, there was this promise 
that the UN was going to come out with a comprehensive program 
for the reintegration of former fighters into society," he said. 
"Unfortunately that wasn't done in Liberia, in Sierra Leone and 
in other places. Because those young men and women who were exposed 
to violence for seven years, were only disarmed and demobilised 
but with no proper incentive to be reintegrated into society," 
says Mr Chea. 
"They were left alone, guns for hire... They've been recruited 
by LURD forces, by the greedy, failed politicians to make war," 
he adds. 
# # # 
(From the files of the BBC Online)
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CENTRAL AMERICA BASTION OF CHILD SEXUAL EXPLOITATION
Central America has become one of the most attractive regions 
for paedophiles. Poverty, the low risk of facing criminal charges 
and a high degree of government corruption contribute to attracting 
men to the area who want to sexually exploit children, 
The information was shared by Casa Alainza Director, Bruce Harris, 
while presenting a study entitled, "Regional Investigation of 
Child Trafficking, Prostitution, Pornography and Sexual Tourism 
in Mexico and Central America." The study was carried out in 
all the Central American countries and in the states of southern 
Mexico.
The director of Casa Alianza, which is affiliated with New York 
City's Covenant House, and which advocates for street children, 
said, "There are many children, who are desperate to eat," and 
this, he said, facilitates child exploitation.
The study was done through interviews with victims, authorities 
and others linked to child exploitation. Investigators found 
that exploitation was not limited to local consumers, but that 
the business is also advertised internationally on the Internet. 
According to the report, Nicaragua is the "principal supplier 
of sexual victims for the whole region." Harris said, "Many 
Nicaraguans, adults, adolescents and even minors, end up in centres 
in Honduras, El Salvador, and principally Guatemala, and in the 
south their destination is Costa Rica, where there is the most 
intense sexual tourism." 
However, there are also networks in El Salvador and Guatemala 
which practice "sexual slavery" in public places such as bars, 
cabarets and other night spots, operating in an "undercover" 
manner, according to researcher Rosamaría Sánchez. Travel agencies, 
hotels and taxi drivers are also involved in these networks.
Researchers said the exploiters of the children use methods such 
as changing birth certificates so that the ages of the children 
are falsified, and they are taking advantage of the Central American 
integration agreements that allow free cross-border traffic among 
Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador and Nicaragua. 
"The situation of trafficking of minors is much worse. It is 
increasing. And the criminals are much more efficient than society," 
said Harris. Even if a perpetrator is arrested for abusing a 
child they are quickly freed, he added.
Casa Alianza plans to provide a legal team in each Central American 
country to offer legal assistance to the victims of sexual exploitation 
and abuse and to investigate, document and present accusations 
against the abusers, Harris said. 
# # # 
(From the files of La Prensa)
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TOBACCO INDUSTRY ACCUSED OF ENGAGING CHILDREN
The Malawi tobacco industry has come under renewed pressure to 
stop using child labour and to make way for other more economic 
crops in the country. But non-governmental organisations and 
even the government are wary of the continuing recruitment of 
children and are seeking to protect their exploitation.
Tobacco accounts for about 70% of the country's foreign exchange 
earnings. But the industry is facing a decline following the 
worldwide anti-smoking lobby.
NGOs are urging estate owners to stop employing children who 
are under 14 years as labourers on the farms.
An official of the Tobacco Association of Malawi, TAMA, Sigman 
Chirambo, reacted strongly, saying it was unfair for the tobacco 
industry to be singled out when other industries were also flouting 
the law.
His remarks were construed to refer to the tea industry, which 
also engages extensive labour in clearing the fields and in some 
cases plucking tea. But the tobacco industry has been widely 
accused of "abusing" workers.
The industry thrives on a tenant system. Under this system workers 
are recruited from two populous districts of Thyolo and Mulanje 
in the country's Southern Region. Incidentally, these two districts 
are the major growers of tea in Malawi, which is also labour 
intensive. Child labour is also rampant in the tea industry.
Critics consider the recruitment procedure of the labour force 
as near slavery. 
The tobacco farmers drive in lorries hundreds of kilometres away 
from their estates in the central and northern regions and search 
of prospective tenants. The majority of the recruits are young 
men lured by "free" transport and promises of bounties on the 
tobacco farms. 
In some cases, those who miss the free transport go by bus on 
their own on borrowed money which they promise to repay later. 
Such category of recruits are tempted to bring along their wives 
and children to help top up the family income while labouring 
on the tobacco farms. This is how the many more children become 
part and parcel of the labour force on tobacco farms.
Concerned about harsh life for children on the tobacco farms 
where they are robbed their right to education, the government 
authorities are conducting a survey on child labour to establish 
the gravity of the problem and seek remedial action. The survey 
being carried out by the Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training, 
was initiated two months ago.
The pilot phase covers the most affected districts of Mzimba 
in the north, Lilongwe in the centre and Mulanje in the southern 
region. The second part would be undertaken in April.
In Malawi the number of children engaged in labour, according 
to official government statistics, was slightly over 100,000, 
about 3-4% of the economically active population. 
# # # 
(From the files of the African Church Information Service)
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NEWS-IN-BRIEF
-- CHILD TRAFFICKING WORKSHOP OPENS
A three-day workshop aimed at strengthening efforts to fight 
child trafficking in West and Central Africa concluded recently 
in Libreville, Gabon. The Second Sub-Regional Consultation on 
Cross-Border Child Trafficking was organised by Gabon's government, 
the UNICEF and the ILO. The main aim of the workshop was to review 
regional efforts since the first Sub-Regional Consultation on 
Cross-Border Child Trafficking in 2000. Participants exchanged 
information on national anti-trafficking strategies and discussed 
closer regional co-operation. The meeting was viewed as an opportunity 
to encourage governments to ratify international agreements that 
seek to protect children, especially ILO conventions 138 and 
182. During the last meeting, held in Libreville in 2000, participants 
pledged to consolidate regional anti-trafficking efforts. (IRIN)
-- GHANA: NATIONAL PROGRAM LAUNCHED TO COMBAT CHILD TRAFFICKING
Recognising the country's reputation as a major supplier of child 
slaves in West Africa, the National Program on Combating the 
Trafficking in Children for Labour Exploitation has been launched 
in Ghana. Implemented by the ILO in collaboration with the UNDP, 
government and NGOs, the program will work to rescue 2,500 children 
over two years, focusing on young children and girls working 
in extremely hazardous conditions and those exposed to physical, 
psychological, social and spiritual harm. The program will also 
promote advocacy, awareness and community mobilisation initiatives 
while working to bolster the capacity of legal and security agencies, 
government ministries, NGOs and religious groups to respond to 
the problem (Ghanaian Chronicle)
-- CHILDREN FOR PEACE
India -- In the wake of growing communal violence in the country, 
thousands of children including former bonded child labourers 
marched in the capital demanding for their 'right to peace.' 
They were marching in solidarity with hundreds of children who 
have been left homeless and destitute during these riots. These 
children are now easy prey to child labour, beggary, prostitution 
and others forms of exploitation. Having already gone through 
a life of misery, the former child labourers urged the governments 
to provide immediate rehabilitation to the riot effected children 
to prevent them from slipping into the labour market. The March 
was organised by the South Asian Coalition on Child Servitude 
(SACCS). It was joined by several other NGOs and child rights 
groups. 
-- GREECE -- DRAFT TRAFFICKING LAW FAILS VICTIMS
The Human Rights Watch urged the members of the Greek parliament 
to strengthen the draft law on human trafficking to protect victims 
and punish corrupt public officials complicit in the trade. The 
draft law is currently under debate in the Parliament. "The 
Greek government has to protect victims if it really wants to 
combat trafficking," said Elizabeth Andersen, Executive Director 
of the Europe and Central Asia Division at Human Rights Watch. 
"Without these protections, trafficking victims will not come 
forward and they will not testify against their traffickers." 
HRW's key concerns are that the draft law fails to criminalise 
all forms of trafficking in persons; to provide explicit penalties 
for complicity and other unlawful involvement in trafficking 
by law enforcement officials; to explicitly prohibit the detention 
of persons for being trafficking victims and; to outline explicit 
measures for witness protection in trafficking cases (Human Rights 
Watch)
-- KENYA: HOPES FOR CHILD WELFARE
Children's rights have been abused with impunity in the past. 
To put in place full safeguards for the realisation of the rights 
of the child in line with the UN Conventions on the Rights of 
the Child (CRC), a new law has come into effect March 1. Under 
the new law, a person who witnesses a child's rights being abused 
can seek redress at the High Court. It also stipulates that those 
found guilty of infringing on the rights of children will be 
liable to a jail term not exceeding 12 months or a fine of up 
to Sh50,000, or both. The Act also outlaws child labour and any 
form of discrimination against children. The government reports 
that there were estimated 3-4 million child labourers in the 
country. Many of the children were working under hardship conditions. 
In some sectors of the Kenyan economy children comprised 70% 
of the labour force, many working in violation of national and 
international laws. (IRIN)
-- CENTRE FOR REHABILITATION OF CHILD DOMESTIC WORKERS LAUNCHED 
Islamabad-Ministry of Women Development, in collaboration with 
ILO-IPEC launched the first Non-Formal Education Centre (NFE) 
aimed at protecting and rehabilitating child domestic workers. 
The centre will be run by an NGO "Service and Development". The 
Ministry of Women Development has launched a program "Services 
for Children in Difficult Circumstances (SCDC)" through National 
Commission for Child Welfare and Development. Two months ago, 
ILO-IPEC allocated US$ 120,000 for the various programs to be 
carried out under the supervision of the Commission. Besides, 
other projects aimed at rehabilitation of children, 9 more Non-Formal 
Education Centres are to be set up with 3 centres each at Rawalpindi/Islamabad, 
Peshawar and Quetta as one centre is already working at Dhok 
Najju, Rawalpindi. It has been estimated that 1000 children 
with 70 per cent girls would be imparted training at these centres 
meant for orientation, awareness raising, promoting education 
and skills enhancement.
(Pakistan Observer)
-- UGANDA: UNICEF CALLS FOR RELEASE OF CHILD SOLDIERS BY LRA
With fighting intensifying in Uganda, UNICEF called on the rebel 
Lord's Resistance Army to release 5,555 children it has abducted 
in raids in the north of the country in the last several years. 
"With renewed fighting under way, children could well be on the 
front lines," UNICEF Executive Director Carol Bellamy said. 
"It is time for the LRA, as well as those that have influence 
with the LRA, to bring about the safe, immediate and unconditional 
release of these children." Despite the condemnation, Bellamy 
did say that LRA abductions of children have dropped in recent 
years, with no new abductions being registered this year. (UNICEF)
-- CHILD LABOUR: UNICEF, NGO SAY COLOMBIA FAILS TO PROTECT 323,000
A recent report by UNICEF and Save the Children reveals that 
Colombia is failing to protect child labourers. "Despite being 
a member of the UN and the ILO, Colombia has not applied pressure 
in passing updated legislation or ratifying agreements that would 
have been of vital importance in confronting child labour," it 
says. Conducted last April, the study compares domestic labour 
in the country to slavery, saying that of the 323,000 children 
working in this market, nearly 90% are girls who work up to 60 
hours a week without adequate nutrition, healthcare, education 
or boarding. It proposed that changes in legislation be made 
to guarantee children's rights and access to education and to 
sensitise employers and families of their needs (El Tiempo).
-- ILO LAUNCHES PROGRAM TO COMBAT CHILD LABOUR IN NICARAGUAN 
COFFEE INDUSTRY
The ILO is launching a $275,000 program in Nicaragua to combat 
child labour in the country's coffee industry during the next 
year and assist 1,500 working children attend school. In collaboration 
with local businesses and aid groups, the program will work to 
assist parents of working children, along with door-to-door public 
awareness campaigns in some areas on the importance of education 
at all levels and the negative effects of labour on a child's 
physical and psychological development. The ILO effort will run 
through March 2003, with the possibility of launching a second 
phase and expanding to other industries within the country. The 
ILO works with 5,000 Nicaraguan children in all sectors of the 
labour market, investing more than $1 million in its efforts 
to eradicate child labour. Some 75,000 Nicaraguan children between 
the ages of 10 and 14 years currently work. (La Prensa)
-- BRAZILIAN SMALL FARMS COMMONLY USE CHILD LABOUR
In Brazil, according to a study by the Getulio Vargas Foundation, 
30% of the work force of small farms in the Brazilian states 
of Goias, Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Minas Gerais 
is comprised of children under the age of 14. According to the 
study, carried out between August and September last year, up 
to 40% of work in Goias and Pernambuco is done by children under 
that age (O Estado de Sao Paulo).
-- PARAGUAYAN CITY IS A SEXUAL EXPLOITATION SPOT OF BRAZILIAN 
GIRLS 
In the brothels of the periphery of Ciudad del Este, a Paraguayan 
city located in the border with Brazil, a large number of Brazilian 
children and adolescents are victims of sexual exploitation. 
Few weeks' back, the National Police of Paraguay found at these 
places six girls, ages from 3-16, of which four were forced to 
work as prostitutes. The girls stated that they were kept in 
a two bedroom house to which clients were taken by Silvia Baez 
Flores, 32. Silvia used to beat the girls up if they denied having 
sex with the clients. One of the girls, aged 9, was Silvia's 
own daughter. (O Estado do Paraná)
-- COPS LAUNCH WAR ON CHILD SEX AT DURBAN CLUBS
Police have declared war on Durban nightclubs that peddle drugs 
and encourage teenage prostitution, warning their owners that 
they will be shut down. The police action comes after the Monte 
Carlo night-club in Stanger Street was raided and 12 young prostitutes 
were removed from the club. The raid was significant in that 
it was the first time in South Africa that the Asset Forfeiture 
Unit was involved in investigations involving child-related crimes. 
The club is known to be frequented by foreigners and young prostitutes, 
some as young as 14 years old. The 50-year-old owner of the 
club was arrested after the raid. 
(IOL)
-- NUMBER OF ARAB STREET CHILDREN INCREASING 
Cairo - A study by the Arab Council for Children and Development 
warns of the growing phenomenon of street children in the Arab 
world and stressed on the importance of creating different programs, 
policies and laws to combat and prevent it. Even though Arab 
governments understand the dangers of this growing phenomenon, 
they still depend on traditional institutional solutions. Arab 
societies became more affected by the international phenomenon 
due to the social, political and economic changes such as the 
increasing population, migration to cities in addition to natural 
disasters, civil wars and other conflicts. Also, children are 
driven to live on the streets due to weak family ties, child 
abuse, domestic violence, unemployment and child labour. (Middle 
East News Online)
-- NHRC ASKED TO PROBE BIHAR CHILD LABOURER'S DEATH
India -- The owner of a carpet factory in Uttar Pradesh has escaped 
unscathed despite brutal murder of a child from Bihar, and torturing 
many other kids who worked under him. The killing of Kari Sahini, 
a13-year-old boy from Darbhangas Phulwaria village, is just another 
example of the terrible plight of the children working in carpet 
industries in Uttar Pradesh. Despite shocking eyewitness accounts 
by fellow children before the court that factory owner Santosh 
Kumar Mishra had killed Kari Sahini by knocking his head against 
the wall, the police of UP and Bihar have done nothing in two 
years to apprehend the culprit. Now veteran trade union leader 
and CPI MLA Umadhar Singh has approached the National Human Right 
Commission (NHRC) for a probe into the incident.
-- SRI LANKA: TAMIL TIGERS STILL RECRUITING CHILD SOLDIERS, RIGHTS 
GROUP SAYS 
Amnesty International accused the Sri Lankan rebel group, the 
Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, of continuing to forcibly recruit 
child soldiers into its ranks, in effect violating the cease-fire 
agreement it signed with the government last month. Under the 
terms of that agreement, both parties pledged to protect the 
civilian populace from abduction, harassment and intimidation. 
According to Amnesty International, at least 18 children have 
recently been recruited by the Tamil Tigers in the northern district 
of Vavuniya, in addition to 13 others who were recruited in mid-February. 
The rebel group has reportedly launched its own investigation 
into the charges. It was not known whether the allegations against 
rebel group will be considered a breach of the cease-fire agreement 
by the committee assigned to monitor the pact. The committee, 
led by Norway and including delegates from Nordic countries, 
is due to start its monitoring tasks in the next few days. (BBC 
Online)
-- ONLINE CHILD EXPLOITATION 'TIP LINE' GARNERS HEAVY USE.
The not-for-profit National Centre for Missing and Exploited 
Children (NCMEC) recently reported that it has received more 
than 64,000 online tips about suspected child abuse since launching 
its CyberTipline in 1998. Established by NCMEC under legislation 
passed by Congress in 1998, the CyberTipline's primary function 
is to serve as an online clearinghouse for tips about suspected 
child pornography on the Internet. Of the 64,000 reports that 
the tip line has recorded since its inception, 55,000 related 
to child pornography. The CyberTipline also records tips about 
child prostitution, child sex tourism, child molestation and 
other offences. Federal law enforcement agencies have access 
to the CyberTipline database. (Washington Post)
-- YAHOO! PORN CLUBS INVOLVED IN PAEDOPHILE CASE
"Once again, a Yahoo! pornography club geared to paedophiles 
has been involved in a child molestation case," said Patrick 
A. Trueman of American Family Association. This time law enforcement 
authorities intervened before molestation could occur. The case 
involved a 55-year-old paedophile, John Ohlinge, of Eau Claire, 
Wisconsin. Ohlinge posted a message seeking to arrange sex with 
a child on a Yahoo! club that offers free child pornography to 
those who merely join the club. Ohlinge has been arrested. Yahoo! 
provided Ohlinge with all the tools he needed to find and molest 
children. In January of this year a 13-year-old girl from Pennsylvania 
was kidnapped by a man she corresponded with on a Yahoo! pornography 
club. In August of last year, a man the kidnapped and raped a 
15-year-old Massachusetts girl and then advertised the girl for 
rent on a Yahoo! pornography club. (PR Newswire)

-- FOOD TO STOP CHILD LABOUR
Lilongwe, Malawi - The Norwegian Agency for International Development 
and UNICEF launched a US $900, 000 program aimed at ending child 
labour in Malawi by helping feed the children of this impoverished 
southern African country. The UNICEF-sponsored survey found 
that 62% of Malawian children under the age of 14 work in family 
businesses or on farms and another 19% do domestic work without 
pay. Labour Minister Alice Sumani said the government was concerned 
that poor parents who sent their children to work instead of 
school were extending the cycle of poverty and illiteracy to 
the next generation. "Malawi is locked in poverty because of 
child labour," Sumani said. Sumani said government was considering 
the idea of introducing legislation that would make child labour 
illegal. (SAPA)
-- CANADA: FACTORY AUDIT DETAILS SOUGHT
A Canadian anti-sweatshop group, Ethical Trading Action Group, 
is demanding that Hudson's Bay Co. (HBC) disclose the results 
of an audit the retailer performed on factories in southern Africa 
making private-label clothing for Zellers department store. The 
Group approached HBC on October 23 with a number of complaints 
about three garment factories in Lesotho. Allegations included, 
among other things, the use of child labour. The group approached 
HBC because the retailer has a code of ethical conduct for suppliers, 
said Bob Jeffcott, policy analyst for the group. HBC assured 
they would - and they did - hire an independent auditor to visit 
the factories. No detailed public disclosure of audits has however 
been made. (Toronto Star)
-- MELBOURNE BECOMES FIRST CITY TO EMBRACE UN GLOBAL COMPACT
"Melbourne business leaders, recognising that the triple-bottom-line 
agenda is an opportunity rather than a threat, have played a 
pivotal role in a world-first," by engaging the entire city in 
the United Nations Global Compact. It encourages voluntary signatories 
to embrace nine principles, drawn from international agreements 
on human rights, labour standards and the environment. Committee 
for Melbourne executive director Janine Kirk says the compact 
is useful as it provides a solid, simple and universal framework 
in which business and the wider community can begin to look at 
putting triple-bottom-line projects into practice. (Australian 
Financial Review)
-- ILO SETS UP WORLD COMMISSION ON THE SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF GLOBALISATION
The ILO has launched a high-level commission, led by the presidents 
of Finland and Tanzania, to examine the social dimension of globalisation. 
The new body, comprised of politicians, academics, social experts, 
and a Nobel economics laureate, will hold its first meeting in 
Geneva, March 25. It is charged with developing recommendations 
for harnessing the globalisation process to reduce poverty and 
unemployment, and to foster growth and sustainable development. 
Director General Juan Somavía and officers of the ILO's Governing 
Body will serve as ex-officio members. Somavía termed the commission 
"an unprecedented effort to promote international dialogue on 
ideas to make globalisation more inclusive." (ILO-US)
-- UNIONS LAUNCH ETHICAL CLOTHING BRAND
In a move designed to drive the sweatshops out of the music business, 
a new brand of ethically produced T-shirts - Ethical Threads 
- has been launched by a group of trade unionists and their supporters 
from the world of rock and roll. The first batch of Ethical Threads 
shirts, sourced from a women's co-operative in Nicaragua, are 
being used on the Billy Bragg UK tour which kicked off early 
this month. The second batch of shirts, cut and sewn by Remploy, 
are being used on the GMB public services campaign. The Ethical 
Clothing Company, which owns the Ethical Threads brand, was set 
up by the Battersea and Wandsworth TUC with the support of the 
GMB London Region after being approached by Billy Bragg and other 
key figures, who were concerned at the difficulty in sourcing 
non-sweated merchandise. The vast bulk of the merchandise used 
in the UK music industry comes from unverified sources where 
sweated labour is rife. For more information contact Geoff Martin 
(440 20) 8682 4224 or 07 831 465 103
-- WOOLWORTHS FALLS FOUL OF CHILD LABOUR REGULATIONS
Staines -- High street retail giant Woolworths has been fined 
after breaching child employment laws at its Staines branch. 
Appearing at Woking Magistrates' Court, representatives from 
the company's Marylebone Road headquarters admitted to not having 
work permits for four 16-year-old schoolchildren employed at 
its Staines High Street store between October and November last 
year. Council investigation revealed that the youngsters were 
allowed to work until late at night. Woolworths accepts that 
the health and education of these children were put at risk. 
A spokeswoman for Woolworths plc, which was fined a total of 
£1,200 and ordered to pay prosecution costs of £60, admitted 
that the company would be taking measures to ensure a repeat 
did not occur.
-- UK COMMITS $14 MILLION FOR PRIMARY EDUCATION 
The United Kingdom will provide $14 million for a new fund aimed 
at ensuring every child in the Commonwealth is enrolled in a 
primary school by 2015, Chancellor of the Exchequer Gordon Brown 
announced. Universal primary education by 2015 is one of the 
UN Millennium development goals. 75 million Commonwealth children 
now have no schools to attend, Brown said, pledging to help "most 
of all the most vulnerable and disadvantaged, street children, 
child soldiers and AIDS orphans." Oxfam, Save the Children and 
ActionAid are to administer the fund, and Brown said most of 
the money will be channelled through NGOs. Countries that could 
benefit from the fund include Bangladesh, Cameroon, Gambia, Ghana, 
India, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Pakistan, 
Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe 
(Associated Press).
-- BANGLADESH: WORLD BANK PROVIDES $121 MILLION CREDIT FOR GIRLS' 
EDUCATION 
The World Bank announced its approval of a $120.9 million no-interest 
credit to support a Bangladeshi program aimed at raising school 
enrolment rates and improving the quality of education for 1.45 
million girls in rural areas. Under the program, the bank will 
help expand Bangladesh's Female Secondary School Assistance Project, 
which began in 1993 and gives out stipends as an incentive to 
families to send girls to participating schools. According to 
the bank, Bangladesh have made great strides in increasing school 
enrolment in a short period of time. The enrolment has increased 
from 462,000 in 1994 to more than 1 million last year. (The World 
Bank)
-- PRIMARY EDUCATION MADE COMPULSORY: PRESIDENT PROMULGATES ORDINANCE 
Islamabad -- President Musharraf promulgated an ordinance, making 
primary education compulsory in the Islamabad Capital Territory 
(ICT). The Islamabad Capital Territory Compulsory Primary Education 
Ordinance, 2002, has come into force at once. Except for a reasonable 
excuse, the ordinance binds the parents to send their children 
to school till the completion of their primary education course. 
In case of non-attendance, a union committee on education, that 
is to be constituted later through a notification, will look 
into the reasons. The committee has also been empowered to take 
all the necessary steps. The parent who fails to comply with 
the ordinance can be convicted with a fine of Rs500 that can 
be increased to Rs20 per day after the conviction, until the 
children are sent to school. Similarly, in case of working children, 
the employer if continues to employ a child, can be convicted 
with Rs1,000 fine that can be increased to Rs50 per day after 
the conviction. (Dawn)
-- PEANUTS FOR PRIMARY EDUCATION: EXPERTS 
India -- The finance minister, Yashwant Sinha, announced an overall 
hike of 30% in elementary education and adult literacy. The education 
experts say the hike in primary education was nominal. "Last 
year, allocation to primary education stood at Rs.4,000 crore. 
This year it is Rs.4,900 crore which means there has been an 
increase of Rs.900 crore only," said Sanjiv Kaura, co-ordinator, 
National Alliance for Fundamental Right to Education. The Tapas 
Majumdar Committee report on financing primary education suggested 
Rs.18,000 crore for the sector. "This allocation is just peanuts." 
An additional Rs.1,650 crore have been allocated for the Sarva 
Siksha Abhiyan, a program for universalisation of elementary 
education, a goal the government wants to achieve by 2003. (The 
Telegraph)
-- PREMJI FOUNDATION PACT WITH UNICEF
India -- The UNICEF signed an agreement with the Azim Premji 
Foundation to jointly support universal primary education programs 
in the country. The foundation and UNICEF will launch a joint 
program in Karnataka, and have identified areas in the State 
such as Yadgir, Shahpur, Jewargi, Gulbarga rural, Aland taluk 
in Gulbarga District, Devdurga taluk in Raichur District, and 
Maddur taluk in Mandya District. The partnership would support 
the Government's "Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan" program and promote 
universalisation of elementary education. The organisations would 
focus on improving the quality of learning in schools, and the 
school environment, including sanitation, developing models of 
community processes that support community groups, and utilisation 
of technology in elementary education. (Indev)
**********************************************************
NEW RESOURCES
-- LEARNING CHANNEL: BEST PRACTICE IN EDUCATION [WEBSITE]
A new education website, www.learningchannel.org offers a rich 
variety of news, thematic reports, and discussion. It seeks to 
facilitate the sharing of experience between organisations and 
individuals working in education, and focuses particularly on 
highlighting best practice. "Success Stories", documenting case 
studies of projects that have made a difference, are a regular 
feature on the site and you can also sign up for an email news 
digest. 
-- E-BRARY PARTNERS WITH UN TO DISTRIBUTE PUBLICATIONS ONLINE 
[WEBSITE]
Library patrons, students, scholars and researchers worldwide 
will soon have online access to current publications in subjects 
ranging from environmental protection to world health, labor 
rights, agriculture and development economics through ebrary, 
a provider of information distribution services. The World Bank 
Group, The United Nations University Press, The World Health 
Organization, The International Labor Organization and The Food 
and Agriculture Organization will make their publications available 
through its site, found at www.ebrary.com. 
-- BACK HOME FROM BROTHELS [PUBLICATION]
This is a case study of the victims of commercial sexual exploitation 
and trafficking across the Nepal-India border. It studies the 
process of repatriation of women and children rescued from brothels 
in India, the challenges faced by NGOs in this process and how 
these girls' lives are before, during and after their horrific 
ordeals of sexual exploitation. For more information, contact: 
Child Workers in Nepal, Tel: 977 1 278064; Email: cwin@xxxxxxxxxx; 
Website: www.cwin-nepal.org
**********************************************************
For comments or any further information please contact: 
Upasana Choudhry 
Editor, Child Labour News Service 
c/o Global March Against Child Labour 
L-6 Kalkaji, 
New Delhi 110 019, INDIA 
Tel : (91 11) 622 4899, 647 5481 
Fax : (91 11) 623 6818 
Email : yatra@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
or childlabournews@xxxxxxxx 
Website: http://www.globalmarch.org/clns/index.html 
********************************************************** 
CHILD LABOUR NEWS SERVICE (CLNS), managed by the Global March 
Against Child Labour, is produced as a non-commercial public 
service. Any part of it may be reproduced without charge. 
*To subscribe/unsubscribe or to contribute any relevant news, 
please e-mail us at childlabournews@xxxxxxxx 
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"A CHILD IN DANGER IS A CHILD THAT CANNOT WAIT" - KOFI ANNAN 
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  • [Cevleis-L] Child Labour News Service Release - March 15 2002, Child Labour News Service <=

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