[Cevleis-L] Child Labour News Service Release - March 1, 2002

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Subject: [Cevleis-L] Child Labour News Service Release - March 1, 2002
From: "Child Labour News Service" <childlabournews@xxxxxxxx>
Date: Sat, 09 Mar 2002 23:06:18 +0550
CHILD LABOUR NEWS SERVICE
1 March 2002
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** GLOBAL TELEVISION CAMPAIGN TO FIGHT HUMAN TRAFFICKING
** 'DANGEROUS WORK IS NO PLACE FOR OUR KIDS'
** CHILD LABOUR RAMPANT IN CHINA'S FIREWORKS INDUSTRY
** UN DEVELOPMENT FINANCING PLAN ALREADY UNDER FIRE.
** NEWS-IN-BRIEF
** ANNOUNCEMENTS
** PUBLICATIONS
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GLOBAL TELEVISION CAMPAIGN TO FIGHT HUMAN TRAFFICKING
Vienna - A new video spot was released recently as a part of 
a global television campaign by the United Nations Office for 
Drug Control and Crime Prevention (ODCCP) to increase education 
and awareness about trafficking in human beings.
The focus of the 30 and 60 second versions of the video spot 
is the trafficking in men, women and children for bonded and 
forced labour activities, such as factory work, fieldwork or 
as domestic servants. The video spot aims to provide a stark 
warning to millions of potential victims about the dangers of 
trafficking and to raise consciousness among the general public 
about the epidemic growth of this modern-day slavery.
Trafficking is a global phenomenon, and the video spot is designed 
to reach audiences in countries where trafficking originates, 
as well as in destination countries where victims often end up. 
Human trafficking is the fastest-growing business of organised 
crime with an estimated 700,000 people trafficked every year 
for purposes of sexual exploitation and forced labour. Europol 
estimates that the industry is now worth several billion dollars 
annually.
Poverty is a driving force in the rise of trafficking, and traffickers 
prey on the most vulnerable - particularly women and children 
- the poorest and the least educated. Traffickers recruit victims 
with the prospect of well-paid jobs abroad, but upon reaching 
their destination country, victims' documents are usually taken 
and they end up forced to pay off alleged debts under the threat 
of violence. Many are then coerced into bonded labour, often 
including sexual exploitation.
In January 2001, ODCCP launched its global television campaign 
to help create awareness about human trafficking with a video 
spot focused on the trafficking of women for purposes of sexual 
exploitation and forced labour. That video spot has been broadcast 
on national networks in over 35 countries, as well as on global 
and regional networks, such as CNN and MTV.
The new video spot on human trafficking for bonded and forced 
labour is currently available in nine languages: English, Russian, 
Chinese, Portuguese, Spanish, French, Swahili, Hausa and German.
(For more information, please email Kemal Kurspahic at 
kemal.kurspahic@xxxxxxxxx 
or Luciana Viegas at l.viegas-assumpcao@xxxxxxxxx)
# # # 
(UN Information Service)
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'DANGEROUS WORK IS NO PLACE FOR OUR KIDS'
-- Trades Hall calls for a ban on children under 15's in worst 
industries
The Victorian Trades Hall Council (VTHC) has called for a total 
ban on the employment of young people, under 15 years, in the 
States four most dangerous industries, agriculture, transport 
and storage, construction and manufacturing.
In its submission to the first government review of child labour 
laws in 30 years, the VTHC has called for a complete employment 
ban on children aged under 13, except where being a child is 
intrinsic to the job such as child actors and models. But it 
has promoted a ban on children aged under 15 from working in 
the four industries with the worst health and safety record.
The council also asked for a big rise in penalties for breaches 
of child job laws to $10,000 or one year's jail. At present, 
most breaches attract fines of about $100.
The Victorian Chamber of Commerce and Industry has endorsed as 
long overdue the need for a review of child employment laws and 
penalties, but it expressed caution at outlawing child labour 
on farms and in mixed businesses.
VTHC secretary Leigh Hubbard said unions expected an outcry from 
farmers, but their protests would not stop the push for greater 
safety.
'These industries have an appalling health and safety record 
and our kids shouldn't be working in such dangerous places. Last 
year alone, 998 workers under 18 years were injured in Victorian 
workplaces and 18 of those injuries resulted in amputations,' 
said Hubbard.
The union submission would not stop children carrying out chores 
such as feeding hens and calves, but would focus on preventing 
children under 15 from being involved in mechanical work such 
as driving tractors and operating harvesters and other heavy 
machinery. The unions also want the abolition of exemption from 
the permit system for charities and family-run businesses.
The Trades Hall submission also calls for the re-establishment 
of the Victorian Youth Industrial Unit, abolished by the previous 
State government, with appropriate allocation of funding and 
resources for research capabilities, education and compliance 
enforcement procedures and to administer the issuing of all child 
employment permits.
Calling the proposal unrealistic, the Victorian Farmers Federation 
has vowed to resist these attempts.
# # #
(From the files of Trades Hall News)
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CHILD LABOUR RAMPANT IN CHINA'S FIREWORKS INDUSTRY
Liuyang, China -- China is the world's number one fireworks manufacturer 
and millions of its products were used to welcome the Lunar New 
Year -- but a large number are assembled by children in potentially 
deadly work environments.
Figures are not available, but visits to villages in China's 
firework production centres in the country's southeast this month 
and recent reports in Chinese media indicate the industry is 
highly dependent on underage workers.
In homes in the countryside of Hunan and Jiangxi provinces -- 
China's firework heartland -- children spend as many as 12 hours 
a day making the products.
"We begin at 9 a.m. and work until 9.30 p.m. We stop only for 
lunch and dinner," said Liu Lizhi, aged 13. She was working late 
into the night alongside her 11-year-old brother Liu Zhilin, 
making fireworks tubes in their home in the outskirts of Liuyang 
city, Hunan.
Some children perform much more dangerous work -- stuffing fuses 
and gunpowder into the tubes -- a task that has left many with 
missing fingernails or burned fingers. Others have suffered far 
more serious burns or have died in frequent explosions.
Wages, paid in piecework, are very low whether in a factory or 
a family home.
The peril of the work was shockingly emphasised last March when 
42 people, mostly children, were killed at an explosion at a 
school which had forced pupils to make fireworks to help pay 
the school's expenses.
China vowed to crack down on illegally operated factories and 
recently banned filling fireworks with gunpowder in homes to 
improve safety. However much of this work still takes place illicitly.
Wang Xiaohong, 14, works almost non-stop from dawn to dusk with 
her mother and two older sisters in a mountain cave they moved 
production to after the ban on production at home.
Despite laws banning child labour, lack of enforcement by the 
central government and local officials has seen China's children 
doing everything from making fireworks in schools to sweating 
in factories in southern Chinese cities making toys, many sold 
abroad.
Li Jun, a manager of Victoria Fireworks, the third largest fireworks 
manufacturer in Liuyang, said foreign buyers are often unaware 
child labour is involved in making products they purchase for 
celebrations such as America's Independence Day.
Even big manufacturers such as Victoria cannot control the problem, 
he said. They buy from smaller factories, which allow adult workers 
to take the unfinished products home.
# # #
(From the files of Agence France Presse)
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UN DEVELOPMENT FINANCING PLAN ALREADY UNDER FIRE.
Organisers of a UN conference seeking innovative ways to help 
poor countries pay for development adopted last month a draft 
action plan that has already come under fire as toothless and 
lacking specifics.
Even Mexico, the host of International Conference on Financing 
for Development, to be held this month, has conceded the draft 
declaration-to be adopted at the meeting's close-fell short of 
the detailed blueprint for change that many nations had hoped 
for during more than a year of preparations.
Critics say the draft text offers vague generalities rather than 
a detailed strategy for helping developing nations cope with 
a global economy that is leaving them farther and farther behind 
their wealthy neighbours. In one key setback for poor countries, 
organisers rejected pleas from numerous delegations including 
EU states that the draft calls for a doubling of foreign aid 
over the next few years. The provision was flatly opposed by 
Washington and Japan, who would have to pay out an additional 
$10 billion a year each to double their official development 
assistance-a figure both governments rejected as simply too costly.
As approved, the draft urged wealthy nations only to make "concrete 
efforts" to give substantially more aid while setting no timetable 
for aid donations to go up.
Also reporting that officials in charge of preparing next month's 
UN summit unanimously adopted a draft agreement calling on donor 
countries to fulfil their pledge of committing 0.7 percent of 
their economy to the aid of developing countries.
The "Monterrey Consensus," which is expected to be adopted at 
the conference, calls on donor nations to increase the level 
of official development assistance (ODA) to 0.7% of their GNP 
to developing nations. The draft agreement also calls for giving 
a larger share of official aid to the least developed countries, 
increasing the ODA target from 0.15% to 0.2% of GNP.
"We see the document as a basis for a path that the UN can embark 
upon,'' said Mexico's UN ambassador, Adolfo Aguilar Zinser. 
"That is in itself a step forward, although it did not go as 
far as some states would have liked."
US President George W. Bush is one of dozens of leaders expected 
to attend the March 18-22 conference in Monterrey, Mexico. Some 
diplomats said his decision to go to Mexico was one of the main 
reasons for the plan's weakness. Mexican officials had contacted 
key delegates during the drafting process to warn that Bush would 
bow out if he thought the declaration could take any embarrassing 
last-minute turns, diplomats said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
# # #
(From the files of Reuters)
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NEWS-IN-BRIEF
-- PRESIDENT ESTABLISHES US TASK FORCE ON TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS
Signalling the Administration's continued commitment to fighting 
trafficking in persons, President Bush signed an Executive Order 
on February 13, 2002, establishing the President's Interagency 
Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. The 
Task Force seeks to strengthen co-ordination among key agencies 
working to fight this terrible scourge and to identify opportunities 
to bolster our efforts to prosecute traffickers, protect victims, 
and prevent future trafficking. The Task Force was established 
as mandated by the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 
(TVPA), to ensure co-ordination among the various US government 
agencies in anti-trafficking in persons initiatives. (US Department 
of State)
-- INTERNATIONAL CHILD LABOUR CONFERENCE OPENS IN THE HAGUE
A three-day international conference on child labour opened in 
The Hague starting February 25, where 300 experts from 50 countries 
will focus on one of the worst forms of child labour, hazardous 
work that places children at risk. As part of that effort, experts 
are expected to devise a solid definition of the term "hazardous 
work." The International Labour Organisation is preparing to 
implement a 1999 treaty banning hazardous forms of child labour, 
but governments first need to reach consensus about what kinds 
of work can be categorised as dangerous. The treaty, which has 
been ratified by 116 countries, also bans compulsory child labour, 
child trafficking and child exploitation, including sexual exploitation. 
(BBC Online)
-- 'COMBATING THE UNACCEPTABLE': VIDEO ON EFFORTS TO TACKLE WORST 
FORMS OF CHILD LABOUR
The ICFTU launched its latest documentary video - Combating the 
Unacceptable, at the International Conference on Child Labour 
in The Hague. The 30 minutes video produced with the support 
of the Dutch Trade Union Confederation (FNV), along with other 
trade union partners, highlights children picking coffee beans 
and tea leaves in Kenya, long hours for young domestic workers 
in the Philippines, local trade unions taking care of street 
children in Brazil and teachers mobilising in India to get the 
parents of child labourers to put their children in school. It 
includes testimony from parents on their difficult socio-economic 
situation and focuses on the joint efforts of trade unions and 
other NGOs to put an end to child labour in their communities. 
To order a press copy of the video, email Louis Belanger, International 
Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU) Press Officer at 
louis.belanger@xxxxxxxxx
-- ILO SIGNS AGREEMENT WITH FOUR NGOS
In Bangladesh earlier this month, the ILO signed an agreement 
with four non-governmental organisations to try to eliminate 
the worst forms of child labour in informal sector in Dhaka City. 
Actions planned by the groups include providing local child labourers 
with informal education, pre-vocational skill training and employment 
services, along with a microcredit program for income-generating 
activities for the parents or guardians of the affected children. 
Dhaka Ahsania Mission (DAM), Resource Integration Centre (RIC), 
Thengamara Mohila Sabuj Sangha (TMSS) and Underprivileged Children's 
Education Programme (UCEP) are the partners of the ILO project 
(Independent).
-- ILO OFFERS ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION FOR WORKING CHILDREN
The ILO has launched a new program to provide alternative schooling 
for working children in Pakistan, where working children's families 
often depend on their income. 10,000 children are enrolled in 
ILO schools, in part thanks to international and financial pressure 
on companies to support these programs. The carpet industry, 
which employs 125,000 children in Pakistan, has donated $1 million, 
while the US Department of Labour has provided $2 million for 
ILO programs adapted to working children. "We take them out from 
their work for 5-6 hours, so we reduce their working hours," 
said an ILO worker in Pakistan. (NPR Morning)
-- ILO TO SURVEY CHILD LABOUR IN TRIBAL AREAS, FRONTIER REGIONS
The ILO with the co-operation of the NWFP government will conduct 
a survey on child labour in Federally Administered Tribal Areas 
(Fata) and Frontier Regions (FRs) to know gravity of the problem 
and compensate the families and children involved in this business. 
The survey was scheduled for November last. It is being carried 
out for the first time in the Fata and Frontier Regions where 
Employment of Children Act 1991 is a statute on child labour. 
Having no other source of income the poor people of Fata send 
their children to work in explosive and fire work, marble, cottage, 
arms and ammunition industries running in these areas, which 
are hazardous to children health and against the Act. Of the 
total child labour, NWFP comprise 32% excluding the Fata.
-- ILO COMES TO THE AID OF MATCH FACTORY CHILD WORKERS
The ILO recently launched a program to eliminate child labour 
at Bangladesh match factories under its 'International Programme 
for Elimination of Child Labour (IPEC). The Social and Economic 
Enhancement Programme (SEEP), an NGO, is implementing the program 
in collaboration with the Ministry of Labour and Manpower. Several 
children are believed to be employed in this industry exposing 
them to health hazards. Children often complain of eye irritation, 
bleeding from hands, burns and other complications. At the initial 
stage, about 200 child workers of Dhaka and Ujala match factories 
will come under the program. They will study at the SEEP-run 
schools and receive the same amount of money they earned from 
their previous job. (The Daily Star)
-- SRI LANKA: RIGHTS GROUPS RELEASES LIST OF CHILDREN ALLEGEDLY 
RECRUITED
Amnesty International has released a list of 13 children between 
the ages of 12 and 16 it suspects have been forcibly recruited 
as soldiers by the rebel Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam in 
Sri Lanka, despite a truce with government forces. The announcement 
comes after a Sri Lankan human rights group, University Teachers 
for Human Rights, charged the LTTE with intensifying conscription 
of children. Releasing names, ages and circumstances under which 
the children allegedly disappeared in Sri Lanka's rebel-controlled 
northern and eastern regions, Amnesty expressed concern for their 
safety and called on the rebels for their release. The rebels 
deny these accusations
-- TRAFFICKER OF GIRLS FROM DOMINICAN REPUBLIC TO COSTA RICA 
JAILED
Maria Salazar Mejia, 30, from the Dominican Republic was jailed 
for five years in Costa Rica for trafficking young Dominican 
girls from her country to Costa Rica where they were being sexually 
exploited. Charges were filed against the Dominican citizen Guillermo 
Leal and an arrest warrant has been issued for his detention. 
The traffickers had been operating since 1998. They would offer 
young girls between 14-18 years a job as a waitress in Costa 
Rica. They would fly them from Santo Domingo to San Jose where 
they would wait for them in the airport and then transport them 
to the tourist town of Quepos - on the Pacific coast - and to 
Siquirres, close to the Atlantic port of Limon, where they would 
be sexually exploited.
-- SEXUAL EXPLOITATION: NICARAGUA HAS REGION'S HIGHEST RATE
A recent study by child rights advocate Casa Alianza on sexual 
trafficking in Mexico and Central America says Nicaragua has 
the most exploited children in the region and that the situation 
is getting worse. Studying several cities throughout the region, 
researchers say the principal types of child exploitation are 
related to prostitution, trafficking and pornography. The study 
also reports on sexual tourism in Nicaragua, saying that the 
majority of solicitors are foreign tourists, mainly from China, 
the United States, Honduras, Guatemala and Costa Rica. Much of 
the child trafficking in Nicaragua originates in El Salvador 
and Guatemala with many of these services being offered through 
newspaper advertisements. (La Prensa)
-- UN AGENCY REPORTS EXTENSIVE ABUSE OF REFUGEE CHILDREN IN WEST 
AFRICA
Children are subjected to "extensive" sexual exploitation in 
refugee camps in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, according 
to an assessment released by the UNHCR and Save the Children 
UK. Much of the abuse is allegedly perpetrated by local staff 
employed by national and international aid organisations, according 
to the assessment, which is based on testimony from children 
in camps. The information provided to the team has been used 
to formulate a series of remedial measures by UNHCR to ensure 
that aid is not used as currency in sexual exploitation. These 
include increasing the international presence in refugee camps, 
deploying more female staff, establishing a secure reporting 
mechanism for raising complaints, identifying the most vulnerable 
and increasing security for them and ensuring those abused have 
access to the legal system so violators are prosecuted.
-- BURUNDI: UNICEF LAUNCHES CHILD-SOLDIER PROJECT
A regional grant from the Belgian government enabled the UNICEF 
to launch a child-soldier demobilisation and reintegration project 
in Burundi early this year, UNICEF said in its January-February 
situation report. The grant also enabled the agency to hire a 
consultant to assess the situation, develop a plan of action 
and initiate the demobilisation and reintegration of child soldiers. 
UNICEF-Burundi signed a memorandum of understanding with the 
government in October that gave it permission to launch this 
project and involves the government in its implementation. According 
to estimates from the international NGO, Coalition to Stop the 
Use of Child Soldiers, there are some 14,000 Burundi child soldiers. 
(IRIN)
-- GABON TO PENALISE PARENTS FOR CHILD LABOUR
Authorities in Gabon have decided to hold parents guilty of child 
labour accountable with one to five years in prison. "The Gabonese 
authorities have decided to impose a one to five year direct 
imprisonment to any person guilty of bringing to Gabon children 
of school-going age to for employment in Gabon," the Benin ambassador 
in Gabon, Lassissi Adekpo informed. "At Benin's embassy in Gabon, 
we receive 6-10 ill-treated Beninese children weekly and accommodate 
them before repatriating them to their families in Benin," he 
revealed. (PANA)
-- ONE MILLION PERUVIAN CHILDREN ARE WORKING
Data from the Peruvian Ministry of Labour indicate that one million 
children aged 6 to 14 are presently working in the country. 
The ILO estimates that 8 in each 10 children who work worldwide 
do not receive any type of remuneration. Save the Children, a 
child rights organisation, is developing an international project 
to monitor poverty indicators in that population group. The study 
intends to focus on one-year-old children from poor families 
and evaluate their life conditions in order to analyse, fifteen 
years later, whether the political, economic and social changes 
that occurred in their countries have led to any improvement 
in children's life standard. Peru is amongst the countries selected 
to be part of the research. (ANDI)
-- 'KNUST' PROMOTES CHILD LABOUR
Students of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology 
(KNUST) are perpetrating the highest form of child labour in 
the country. Investigations have revealed that about 500 boys 
from neighbouring communities between the ages of 5 and 10 render 
various forms of services to the students. The "small boys" or 
"errand boys", as they are called by the students, provide services 
like washing clothes, utensils and cars, sweeping, cooking, etc., 
for which they are paid an amount of ¢500 or more. The KNUST 
authorities are condoning this shameful practice by issuing ID 
cards to a number of boys to ensure easy identification in case 
of theft. (Ghanaian Chronicle - Accra)
-- NAKONDE NGO LECTURES TRADERS ON CHILD LABOUR
National Single Parents Association of Zambia (NSPAZ), a non-governmental 
organisation in Nakonde district has embarked upon a program 
to sensitise traders and children used as cheap labour. The organisation 
is said to have identified 600 children from various areas involved 
in all sorts of businesses, including cheap labour. Nakonde central 
is the main area where many children were used as cheap labour 
to ferry merchandise from the business town of Tunduma in Tanzania 
into Zambia to the railway or bus stations. "These children are 
terribly abused by both international and local traders who make 
them carry heavy goods on their heads. (The Times of Zambia)
-- MDLADLANA OUT TO GET BAD EMPLOYERS 
Cape Town - Membathisi Mdladlana, the labour minister disclosed 
his department's plan to launch a "national inspection blitz" 
this April, focusing on the security, construction and farm sectors, 
which were among the worst offenders when it came to poor working 
conditions and employing child labour. 1,336 posts have been 
created for inspectors who will be deployed throughout the country. 
Not only were poor working conditions inhuman, but they threatened 
significant export opportunities that had been opened up by the 
American Growth and Opportunities Act. 
-- RUSSIA'S LEGAL LOOPHOLES FAVOUR CHILD-SEX RINGS
Criminals in Russia are exploiting loopholes in the law to escape 
prosecution for sex-crimes involving children. Defects in the 
current legal code with regard to child prostitution mean that 
in 2000 not a single prosecution in this category resulted in 
a conviction, said Alexander Bigulov, head of the state prosecutor's 
department for juvenile affairs. The deputies are now discussing 
a proposed bill that would make the sale of pornographic material 
a serious crime. They felt the need for a stronger legislation 
to prevent Russia from becoming a leading centre for child pornography 
and sex tourism. Bigulov noted that in 2000, 361 cases of selling 
pornographic material were opened, of which 242 were brought 
to court resulting in 270 people being convicted. However almost 
all of those convicted were the sellers and not the producers 
of the material. (Agence France Presse)
-- STARBUCKS OFFERS FAIRTRADE CERTIFIED COFFEE IN THE UK
Starbucks Coffee Company (UK) Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary 
of Starbucks Coffee Company, announced an agreement with the 
Fairtrade Foundation to sell Fairtrade Certified coffee in Starbucks 
stores in the UK. The agreement means that Starbucks customers 
will be able to buy Fairtrade Certified coffee in all Starbucks 
stores by the summer. "We believe that as the leading retailer, 
roaster and brand of speciality coffee in the world, our actions 
will both increase consumer awareness of the Fairtrade movement 
and of the benefits to farmers who produce these coffees," said 
Cliff Burrows, managing director, Starbucks Coffee Company (UK) 
Ltd. (Starbucks Corporation Release)
-- SACCS REHABILITATION INITIATIVE HONOURED 
South Asian Coalition on Child Servitude run Bal Ashram, a transit 
rehabilitation centre for children rescued from bondage has won 
the prestigious Ramkrishna Jaidayal Harmony Award 2000 for its 
exemplary work. Since its institution by Organisation of Understanding 
and Fraternity in 1982, the award is being given to journalists 
and writers whose contributions are judged commendable for the 
cause of national integration and voluntary action. The award 
selection committee is headed by the former Chief Justice of 
India, Justice PN Bhagwati. The award trust is gradually changing 
its outlook by selecting social projects, which is a great move. 
Since 1998, Bal Ashram has been imparting education as well as 
skill training to the former child labourers.
-- NOMINEES FOR THE CHILDREN'S NOBEL PRIZE
Casa Alianza is one of the three nominated finalists for this 
year's "World's Children's Prize", often called "the children's 
Nobel Prize" for the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. 
The other two nominees are Nkosi Johnson (posthumously), a 12 
year old South African boy, an outspoken critic of the lack of 
international support for the African AIDS crisis amongst children, 
and Maiti in Nepal, which works to rescue girls who are sold 
to brothels. The prize will be awarded by Queen Silvia of Sweden 
in Stockholm in April. The winner is selected by a jury comprised 
of 16 children from around the world who were previously street 
children, child soldiers, debt slaves, refugees or children subjected 
to other violations of their rights or who are fighting for children's 
rights. The prize, which includes a cash award of USD50,000 was 
created by the Swedish NGO "Children's World" in 2000. (Casa 
Alianza)
-- NEPAL: NATIONAL PLAN FOR EDUCATION ON THE WAY
Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba informed that a national plan 
for providing basic and primary education to all in the country 
was being made with the co-ordination of the ministry of education 
and sports. Under the national plan, an action plan for achieving 
the goal of making arrangements for appropriate development of 
all the children throughout the country by 2015 would be prepared. 
Stating the draft of Nepal's Tenth Periodic Plan was being formulated 
at present, Deuba reiterated that early childhood development 
would be one of the main subject of the periodic plan. (The Kathmandu 
Post)
-- NIGERIA: WORLD BANK TO LAUNCH EDUCATION PROJECT
According to sources, the World Bank's latest education initiative 
for Nigeria, the Universal Basic Education (UBE) Project, is 
slated to start in September. Lead Education Specialist Brigitte 
Duces that the UBE project, which will cover all 36 states, aims 
to improve primary education for all school-age boys and girls. 
The project will be conducted in phases, the first of which will 
involve 16 states. Each state will receive $5 million from the 
World Bank. UBE, a multi-donor project spearheaded by the World 
Bank, will also include the construction and renovation of infrastructure 
and provision of teaching materials. The total cost of the project 
is estimated at $180 million. Other contributors include the 
UNESCO, UNICEF, USAID and the DFID.
-- TANZANIA FACES FUNDING GAP
As Tanzania began its first year of free primary schooling, so 
many children turned up to register that in some areas the government 
was offering to provide tents in lieu of sufficient classrooms 
to put them in. According to estimates, some 2.5 Tanzanian children 
were out of school before the introduction of UPE. But the government 
is already facing difficulties in footing the bill for UPE. Kate 
Dyer, of local NGO Maarifa ni Ufunguo, fears that parents may 
grow disillusioned as the system struggles to cope with the huge 
jump in enrolments. To supplement the money freed up by debt 
relief, the government has drawn deep into its domestic budget, 
but there is still a funding gap which can only be met by taking 
out a new loan. The debt relief money received is providing tantalising 
possibilities for education in Tanzania but it may not prove 
enough to enable them to be realised.
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ANNOUNCEMENTS 
-- WORLD BANK TO CONVENE CONFERENCE ON FINANCING MECHANISM
Over the past months, the World Bank with funding from the Dutch 
government has been doing country by country analyses of policy 
challenges and financing gaps in the 32 countries that are off 
track for achieving universal primary education (UPE) by 2015. 
The Bank and the Dutch are now using this data to inform ongoing 
work on an "outcomes-based" international funding mechanism. 
Ideas for such a mechanism will be discussed at a conference 
in Amsterdam on April 10-11. The objectives of the conference 
are to develop a common understanding regarding the political 
and financial implications of meeting the EFA targets, and to 
agree upon an analytical framework for proposed action to support 
countries with credible education plans.
-- CHARTING PROGRESS TOWARD PROTECTION OF CHILDREN WORLDWIDE 
- ISPCAN CONFERENCE
The International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect 
invites you to attend its 14th International Congress in Denver, 
Colorado July 7-10, 2002. The program will include master classes, 
plenary sessions, symposia, research presentations, poster sessions 
and workshops with world leaders in the field. Over 2000 delegates 
and professionals committed to Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention 
and Treatment, are expected to attend from over 50 countries. 
For more information visit http://www.ispcan.org/events.html 
or email at 2002@xxxxxxxxxx
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PUBLICATIONS
-- ECPAT: PREVENTING CHILD SEX TOURISM SERIES 
In order to stimulate new initiatives, ECPAT International has 
compiled a series of successful examples. Each document highlights 
one action that can be undertaken to stop the commercial sexual 
exploitation of children. The first part of the document provides 
guidelines on starting such action. The second part provides 
a case study of one such initiative, drawing from experience 
and summarising lessons learned. For further information write 
to ECPAT International Secretariat at info@xxxxxxxxx 
-- CHILDREN NOT SOLDIERS 
GUIDELINES FOR WORKING WITH CHILD SOLDIERS AND CHILDREN ASSOCIATED 
WITH FIGHTING FORCES 
These guidelines are concerned with what child protection agencies 
can do to reduce the gap between international agreements relating 
to children and armed conflict and the daily reality faced by 
these children. The guidelines provide both a framework for 
action and examples of organisational good practice. For further 
information write to Save the Children UK, at enquiries@xxxxxxxxxxxx
-- 'CHILD LABOUR IN NEPAL' 
This book looks at the tragic exploitation of Nepal's child workers, 
it also looks at what will happen to their future if they are 
not educated and trained to be able to take their place in society 
as potentially economically independent adult workers and provides 
information on what is now being done to halt the exploitation 
of children in Nepal. The report also provide an outline of the 
range of child labour currently seen in Nepal. This book is 
published by CWIN in collaboration with Anti-Slavery International, 
UK. For more information write to Child Workers in Nepal at cwin@xxxxxxxxxx)

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For comments or any further information please contact: 
Upasana Choudhry 
Editor, Child Labour News Service 
c/o Global March Against Child Labour 
L-6 Kalkaji, 
New Delhi 110 019, INDIA 
Tel : (91 11) 622 4899, 647 5481 
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